Speakers:

 


Jeremy Grimshaw 

 

(MBChB, PhD) is an acknowledged international leader in knowledge translation and implementation research. 

He is a Senior Scientist in the Clinical Epidemiology Program, a full professor in the Department of Medicine at the University

of Ottawa and holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Health Knowledge Transfer and Uptake.  

He is the Director of the Canadian Cochrane Centre and Network and Coordinating editor of the Cochrane Effective Practice 

and Organisation of Care review group. Prior to his current position, he was a Program Director in the Health Services Research Unit

in Aberdeen, UK.  He has over 280 peer reviewed publications in this area.  He is the Principal Investigator of KT Canada 

(a team grant of approximately CAD  9.8  million  from  the  Canadian  Institutes  of  Health  Research),  the  first  national  knowledge 

translation researcher involving six centres across Canada.  He has previously collaborated with Partners 1, 3 and 4 

in several EU funded projects (Changing Professional Practice, Afroimplement, REBEQI).

 

Andy Oxman

 

(MD, MSc) is a senior researcher who contributed to the development of evidence‐based medicine since he was at McMaster University

from 1984- 94. He has been chair of the Cochrane Collaboration  Steering  Group  and  was  the  founding  editor  of  its  Handbook. 

He is a founding member and coordinator of the GRADE Working Group. He is a member of the WHO Advisory Committee 

on Health Research and chair of the Subcommittee on the Use of Research Evidence.

 

Richard Baker

 

(MD) is professor and director of the CLAHRC, and lead of its implementation theme, Head of the Department of Health Sciences, 

and a general practitioner. He is author of 170 peer reviewed publications, has been a collaborator in several EU

funded projects, and was awarded NIHR Senior Investigator status in 2008. Research interests have included methods 

of translating evidence into practice, patient experience of care, and patient safety in primary care.

 

Gillian Leng